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Entries in the Ildhafn journal of Dance

For a list of Ildhafn's upcoming regular practices and meetings, please see our Regular Activities page.

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on Sep 28th, 2011

Present: William, Katherina, Anna, Caterine

Finally put all four verses of Spagnoletta Nuova in modo di Madriglia together. More revision of Lioncello, Contrapasso Nuovo.

 

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on Sep 21st, 2011

Present: Anna, Caterine, William, Katherina

Learned the third verse of Spagnoletta Nuova in modo di Madgriglia. Brought Contrapasso Nuovo out of mothballs (doing it with a missing couple). Brushed up Leoncello Vecchio. Played with Amoroso, and the random playlist.

 

Spagnoletta works to Ramstein, far better than you'd think.

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on Sep 15th, 2011

Katherina, William and Caterine had a full, strenuous but fairly casual evening.

After warming up (Spero, some others I now forget) we spent the first half of the practice revising the first half of Spagnoletta Nuova in modo di Madriglia.

The rest of the evening was improvisatory:

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on Sep 1st, 2011

Present: Katherina,William, Nadia, Caterine

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on Aug 19th, 2011

William, Caterine, Nadia and Katherina woke up our legs with Anello and Amoroso (including the new ending for Amoroso), before launching into an evening of Spagnolette. The first two are old favourites, the last is new to us.

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on Aug 15th, 2011

On Saturday the 13th of August Catherine, William and Katherina performed at the Winter Warm-up, an annual dancing event run by the Ruritanian Society and the Danish Club.

 

We danced Spagnoletta Nuova for three, then William and Katherina danced Pavaniglia. The performance went well, and both dancing and costumes got many appreciative comments.

 

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on Aug 4th, 2011

Having rehearsed last week for our performance at the Auckland Museum Demo, this week we were working on our upcoming performance at the Winter Warmup - the annual dancing extravaganza of the Ruritanian Society, on the 13th of August.

 

Our current plan, pending a successful dress rehearsal next week, is to perform Pavaniglia and Spagnoletta Nuova. If you'd like to come and watch us, please do! (Contact Katherina for details).

 

We danced:

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on Jun 16th, 2011

Anna ran the first hour of dancing, as usual, for herself, Caterine, William and Sergei.

[She can fill in this section - I had to miss it]

In the second hour, Anna and William rehearsed Cesarina, before we danced Pungente Dardo, Ginevra and Spagnoletta Nuova.

Finally, we relaxed with Amoroso, but with an extra twist: having re-read the two sources I've altered the ending slightly. The dance is now:

1. The couple dance 8 pive together

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on Jun 9th, 2011

We (Katherina, Anna, Caterine and William) were all a little under the weather this week, so we took it fairly easy.

 

We warmed up with Anello and Rostiboli Gioioso.

Then Fulgente Stella, one of Caroso's many cascarde. Fulgente Stella is unusual for two reasons:

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on Jun 2nd, 2011

A few branles to warm up, then, since we were five with Amalie in town, we decided to return to the only renaissance dance for five that I know of : Verceppe.

 

Verceppe is a moderately complicated 15th C Italian ballo. It's made harder because the music we use (on Forse che Si Forse che Non) is beautiful, but not always easy to hear the rhythms in, and this dance has a lot of rhythmic changes. We danced Verceppe quite a lot at one point, but none of us remembered it well, so it took most of the hour to refresh.

 

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on May 27th, 2011

On Thursday the 26th of May was held a small formal ball in honour of the birthdays of Master William de Cameron and Mistress Katherina Weyssin. The dancers were the aforementioned Mistress Katherina and Master William, and Lady Caterine de Vantier, Lord Ludwig von Regensburg, Lady Anna de Wilde, and Lady Eleanor Hall.*

Lord Ludwig was our herald for the evening, and Mistress Katherina was maestra da ballo.

All the dancers were beautifully attired, in silks and velvets,** with jewels of inestimable worth,*** as befit their station and the joyful occasion.

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on May 19th, 2011

Open Dance (Anna teaching)

  • Lorrayne Almain
  • Earl of Essex Measure
  • Amoroso
  • Branles: Double, Simple, Gai, Burgundian

Advanced Dance (Katherina teaching)

  • Bassa Colonna (new)
  • Pavaniglia (revised 4th and 5th mutanze)
  • Alba Novella (new, just Katherina and William)

 

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on May 12th, 2011

A quiet and slightly truncated dance practice this week. No begginers, so we went over Il Conto del Orco and (?) Chiara Stella. Much discussion of whether the trangi in Il Conto are better done forwards or backwards - we settled on forwards.

That done, we quickly revised all the mutanze from Pavaniglia (no surprise that the 4th and 5th consistently give us the most trouble), then danced it a few times all the way through. It's still pretty good, given that we've not danced it since Faire in February.

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on May 8th, 2011

We only had time for a little dancing at the Royal Visit (30th April, 2011), but we made the most of what we had.

After the Royal Court in the afternoon, while our new Baron and Baroness accustomed themselves to their role and regalia, and before the feast, we took the opportunity to use the space in the feasting hall for the purpose for which it was surely created!

First, Mistress Katherina Weyssin and Master William de Cameron danced Pungente Dardo, a delightful balletto recorded by Maestro Caroso in Il Ballarino (published in Venice in 1580).

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on Mar 31st, 2011

A somewhat constrained session, because Katherina forgot a piece of equipment, so we had only the music William had on him.

As only the advanced dance group was present, we didn't distinguish the sessions especially.

We warmed up with Amoroso, and lacking any newer dances, La Figlia de Guglielmino. Then worked through mk.II of Anna's class on Cesarina, as practice for Festival.

We practiced galliards a little more, to the Volta music on Celeste Giglio - fun, pretty, but not the easiest.

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on Mar 24th, 2011

Open dance, taught by Anna:

We started with Amoroso, then the Branles of Champagne - Cassandra, Pinagay, Charlotte, La Guerre, Aridan.

Then Anna worked the class through the first few verses of Cesarina, giving the instructions in the original Italian. We came up with some interesting and varied floor-patterns.

 

Advanced Dance, taught by Katherina:

More work on basic galliard technique. Then Trihory and some Almains, for a simple finish.

 

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on Mar 17th, 2011

Present - Katherina, Eleanor, Caterine, William

 

OPEN DANCE:

  • Amoroso
  • Branles of Champagne: Cassandra, Pinagay, Charlotte, La Guerre, Aridan
  • New Almain
  • Trihory

ADVANCED DANCE : Galliards

An extended session working on basic galliard technique, until we were tired and sweaty. We looked  at the basic cinquepasso, both Arbeau's version and Caroso's versions, and kept at it. Talked about small changes in weight and balance, etc, to improve landings.

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on Mar 10th, 2011

Just a small group of us tonight, and no-one was feeling very athletic, so Caterine and William worked their way through the CF ball list while Anna and Katherina talked (and sniffled - it's the season for colds).

Posted by Anna de Wilde to the Dance journal on Feb 24th, 2011

During the Open/beginners hour we did Earl of Essex Alleymane, Lorrayne Almain, Madam Sosilia's Pavan, Black Almain, Amoroso and Petite Riense.

Posted by Katherina Weyssin to the Dance journal on Feb 24th, 2011

"Barriera" was a popular 16thC Italian dance (or so it seems, from the number of sources that record it). It came up in conversation, because we were talking about having Combat at the Barriers for our upcoming event. We practiced the version for one couple, from Caroso's Il Ballarino.

 


In the hour after the open dance class Mistress Katherina Weyssin looks at some more difficult material with her advanced students. All are welcome to stay and watch; participation is by invitation, and may depend on the style.

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