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Dancing before Their Majesties

Submitted by Katherina Weyssin on May 8, 2011 - 1:52pm
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We only had time for a little dancing at the Royal Visit (30th April, 2011), but we made the most of what we had.

After the Royal Court in the afternoon, while our new Baron and Baroness accustomed themselves to their role and regalia, and before the feast, we took the opportunity to use the space in the feasting hall for the purpose for which it was surely created!

First, Mistress Katherina Weyssin and Master William de Cameron danced Pungente Dardo, a delightful balletto recorded by Maestro Caroso in Il Ballarino (published in Venice in 1580).

www.youtube.com/watch

A little more stilted than usual, perhaps, because we hadn't tried it with train, sword, and supportasse to deal with, but still pretty. Clearly we'll have to dress up more often!

 

That done, Anna de Wilde and Caterine de Vantier joined us for the cascarda Chiara Stella (another favourite from Maestro Caroso). They'd very graciously let Katherina and William have the whole space for Pungente Dardo, even though they like dancing it too.

 

At this point we adjourned for the feast.

 

During the feast, Lady Ginevra asked that we show her the Bassadanza Ginevera, as I'd initially reconstructed it in her honour, and it's become one of our favourites. Since she'd asked so nicely, and in honour of her birthday, we agreed (after a little time for William and Katherina to talk through the steps - we'd not danced it for a few months).

 

Dancing a 15thC bassadanza in very restrictive 16thC clothing was an interesting experience: it is very clear that these dances were NOT composed with farthingales in mind, and we both found ourselves dancing a blended style, with our ears and our feet telling us to conform to 15thC aesthetic, while eyes and clothes told us we were in the 16th C. Nevertheless, I think the performance went reasonably well, and I certainly enjoyed dancing it.

 

Time to make 15th C dancing clothes too?

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