As I me walked

Discussion: 

This is transcribed in 3/4 in the modern edition, but has a rather funky 2/4 3/4 feel: Ravenscroft's notation, without barlines, allows the stresses to fall where they feel natural.

Who does what: 

Ildhafners (and regular visitors) who have learned this: Katherina Weyssin, William de Cameron, Anna de Wilde, Emrys Twdr, Vettoria di Giovanni da Verona, Eleanor Hall, Serafina di Giovanni Carducci, Christine Bess Duvaunt, Cicilia Lyon, Ginevra Isabella di Serafino Visconti, Amalie von Brisache, Katherine of Glastonbury

Ildhafners who have learnt all four verses: Katherina Weyssin, William de Cameron, Anna de Wilde, Emrys Twdr, Vettoria di Giovanni da Verona, Katherine of Glastonbury

This round is popular in Darton - Katherina learned it from Kazimira.

Sound: 

Once through "in unison", then twice through as a round, with all four voices.

Composer: 
Ravenscroft
Sheet Music: 

Modern notation:

Facsimile:

You can sing it at any comfortable pitch. We often sing it in G - start note is G, range is G to D.

When we use all four "verses", we usually do it like this:

  • First verse in unison
  • First verse as a round, each person singing it once through
  • Second verse, in unison: as soon as the last person finishes the last "cuckoo" of the first verse we all begin the second
  • Second verse as a round, once through
  • Third verse in unison
  • Third verse as a round, once
  • Fourth verse in unison
  • Fourth verse as a round
  • First verse in unison, once, to finish off

When we're singing this as a round, we often start with the "cuckoo", as this can make counting easier.

I.e. In unison, we all sing "As I me walked in a May morning I heard a bird sing *** cuckoo"

The first person goes straight on, singing (part in unison is in bold)

"As I me walked in a May morning I heard a bird sing *** cuckoo As I me walked ..."

The second repeats the "cuckoo" before continuing:

"As I me walked in a May morning I heard a bird sing *** cuckoo *** cuckoo As I me walked ..."

The third has three cuckoos, and the fourth four, etc.

Source: 
Pammelia
Parts: 
any 4
Type: 
round
Music Categories: 
English